this film is more interesting than that one

Hi folks,

A: The film was more interesting than vãn what I expected.

Bạn đang xem: this film is more interesting than that one

B: The film was more interesting than vãn I expected (it vĩ đại be).

I have never been able vĩ đại explain why the use of 'what' in sentence A is incorrect, I only know it sounds terrible - although this is standard 'poor' native English. Could anyone explain the grammar rule, please?

I teach Spanish speakers, but La película fue más interestante que lo que esperaba... also sounds clumsy vĩ đại bủ - although they are Basque Spanish speakers, sánh maybe this is down vĩ đại poor grammar?

Thanks,
Lucy

Let's try vĩ đại think this through.

Xem thêm: hợp chất hữu cơ la gì

Structurally speaking, what you need here is a comparative clause (because you are making a comparison), and in (B), "I expected" is precisely that: a comparative clause. That's why (B) feels natural. The comparative clause "I expected" is a noun clause; clause, because we have a conjugated verb ("expected"), and noun clause because it functions as complement of the preposition "than." We have the same preposition-noun relationship in "the film was more interesting than vãn the book," where "the book" plays the same function (complement of the preposition "than") that "I expected" does in (B). One characteristic feature of comparative clauses is that the subordinated clause is reduced relative vĩ đại the main clause. In other words, part of the subordinated comparative/noun clause is omitted, as in "the film was more interesting than vãn I expected." The comparative clause can always be expanded, and that's how we get "the film was more interesting than vãn I expected

it vĩ đại be

."

Xem thêm: đề anh thpt quốc gia 2018

In (A), "what I expected" is a relative clause; however, this relative clause isn't modifying any noun (it has no direct antecedent), and that's why (A) feels odd. More precisely, "what I expected" is a fused/free relative clause, where the pronoun "what" becomes its own antecedent. Now, what's interesting is that some speakers quite readily accept (A). How tự we trương mục for that, syntactically? Well, relative clauses with no antecedent typically become nominalized; that is, they become noun clauses. That's how you get "what he did was wrong," where the (fused) relative clause "what he did" functions as a noun, that is, as the subject of the sentence. Thus, with no antecedent (other than vãn "what" itself), "what I expected" in (A) becomes a noun clause, and as such it functions as the complement of the preposition "than" in "the film was more interesting than vãn what I expected."

There may be other analysis that come vĩ đại your conclusion (that the first one is incorrect), but that's how I see things. Hope it helps some.

Cheers